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PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

Conversation on the launch of Manifest: A Journal of American Architecture and Urbanism, Issue No. 1

  

"Looking Inward."

October 8, 2013 | 5.00pm | N107, Princeton School of Architecture

Manifest was founded as a means to initiate a critical conversation about the state of American architecture, its cities, and its hinterland. While it questions the assumptions behind singular notions/constructions of America by tracing its origins and its global influence, Manifestalso aims to define the uniqueness of American forms of city-building and the distinct set of political parameters through which these forms are shaped. “Looking inward,” is here offered as an interrogation of a “New World” taken for granted. Rather than abandoning this new world for a newer world elsewhere or circling the wagons here at home, this issue of Manifest speaks less to a continual rehearsal of the initial American experiment in favor of a prompt toward the active shaping of its evolution.

Anthony Acciavatti is an architect and principal of Somatic-Collaborative, an award winning architecture firm based in New York City. At present he is pursuing a Ph.D. in the History of Science Program in the Department of History at Princeton University. He has taught advanced architecture studios and seminars at RISD and Northeastern University. He earned a Master in Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, where he was awarded the Frederick Sheldon Fellowship to continue his research on architecture and urbanism in the Americas. His research has received funding through a J. William Fulbright Fellowship as well as fellowships from the Ford Foundation, Harvard University, and Princeton University amongst others. His work has been published in Architectural Designmagazine, Bracket, OnSite, SARAI, and Topos. He is the author of the book Trojan Horse (2011), as well as the author of the forthcoming books Cosmic Comics: Transects of Ganga-Jamuna doab (2012) and Dynamic Atlas: Changes of State Along the Ganges River Corridor (2012).

Justin Fowler is a Ph.D. candidate at the Princeton School of Architecture. He received an M. Arch from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design and previously studied Government and the History of Art and Architecture at the College of William and Mary. His writing has appeared in publications such as Volume,Speciale Z Journal, Thresholds, PIN-UP, Domus, Conditions, and Topos, along with book chapters in Material Design: Informing Architecture by Materiality(Birkhauser, 2010), and Aircraft Carrier: American Ideas and Israeli Architectures after 1973 (Hatje Cantz, 2012). He is the editor of Evolutionary Infrastructures by Weiss/Manfredi (Harvard GSD, 2013). He has worked as a designer for Dick van Gameren Architecten in Amsterdam, Somatic Collaborative in Cambridge, and managed research and editorial projects at the Columbia University Lab for Architectural Broadcasting (C-Lab) in New York. He also served as managing editor for C-Lab issues of Volume magazine.

Dan Handel is an architect, a Ph.D. candidate at the Technion Israel Institute of Technology, and the inaugural Young Curator at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal, for which he developed the exhibition First, the Forests. Additionally, he curated Aircraft Carrier, the exhibition at the Israeli pavilion in the 13th Venice architecture biennale, which was also exhibited at the Storefront for Art and Architecture in NYC and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. He holds degrees from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem. His writing has appeared in Thresholds, Frame, San Rocco,Pin-Up, Bracket, and the Journal of Landscape Architecture, among others. He is the editor of the publication Aircraft Carrier: American Ideas and Israeli Architectures after 1973 (Hatje Cantz, 2012).

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